Ahead of our next match

Get to know Leamington


The club was established in 1933 as the work team for Lockheed Borg & Beck, which is where the club nickname “the Brakes” originated from – the products manufactured by the company.



The club first entered the Warwick & District League, before moving to the Coventry Works League for the 1934/35 season. The Brakes eventually transitioned to the Leamington & District League in 1940 but would return to the Coventry Works League two seasons later. The club then jumped between the Coventry & District League, the Central Amateur League, the Birmingham Combination, Birmingham & District League and the Midland League before settling in in the Southern League Division One. In between, the club was also renamed Lockheed Leamington in 1947, and AP Leamington after Lockheed was renamed Automotive Products in 1973.


The club’s first season in the Southern League Division One saw them win the Southern League’s League Cup, and in 1975/76 they earned promotion to the Premier Division of the Southern League. In 1977/78, the club ended up in seventh place in the League but that was enough to earn their membership in the Alliance Premier League. The Brakes were relegated in the 1981/82 season, but won the Southern League Premier Division in 1982/83 failing to be promoted due to ground regulations of the Alliance Premier League. Leamington AP dropped into the Midland Division and went into abeyance at the end of the 1987/88 season. The club would only reform in 2000 joining the Midland Combination. A series of championship wins took the club to the Midland Alliance prior to the 2004/05 season, being promoted to the Southern League once again in 2007/08. The Brakes made it to the Premier Division of the Southern League after the 2008/09 season. Leamington finally made it to the Conference North after winning the Southern League Premier Division in 2012/13, but were relegated again in 2014/15 before bouncing back to the National League North in 2016/17 through the promotion play-offs where they remain today.